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Home » Why am I here? Who are these people with the giant feet? What’s going on?

Why am I here? Who are these people with the giant feet? What’s going on?

What is ItchyFeetOnTheCheap.com?

It’s a website, dummy. Geez.

Besides that and sarcastic writing, it’s also: money saving travel tips, a real look at the world and its amazing places, video adventures that will surely entertain your eye holes, complete backpacking guides to the world’s coolest places, information on living abroad, reviews in which I try and get you to buy something you don’t need so I can make like 20 cents.

There are a lot of sites that can provide good travel information, but a lot of them are a mix of fluff and bullshit. You won’t find that here. We won’t go on about the amazing spiritual adventures in India. We like to bitch about things that we don’t like. We rarely rave about popular tourist attractions, but we do find amazing places — just not where the other guys tell you they will be. Yes, Machu Picchu is fantastic, you don’t need me to tell you that, but do you know how to get there for less and with tons more adventure?

Why?

The plan to create Itchy Feet on the Cheap came about while organizing a backpacking trip to South America. We had access to all the regular resources – Frommer’s, Lonely Planet, Virtual Tourist (are they still even a thing?) – and while the information they provide is extremely useful for general planning, we found most of the locations they suggest to be shadows of their former selves. By the time you get to a Frommers recommended restaurant, it’s a tourist haven. Sadly, our value is in the fact that no one pays any attention to us. We’re like that cool hipster bar that you made those bad decisions in last weekend.

Who?

Itchy Feet on the Cheap are, in no specific order, Sara and Ryan. A longtime couple, who may-or-may-not be married, and have been traveling together for almost 10 years. They are currently living in China, but have lived in Vietnam and Slovakia. Why am I talking about them like I’m not one of them?

Sara is a nerd/science teacher. She’s taught students from all over the world. She’s vomited on a bus in the Andes, and on a boat in Cambodia. Her hunger for travel is matched only by her hunger for trying new and interesting food. Her indifference while on camera is incredible.
Sara in southeast asia
Ryan basically does all the work on this, so he controls the narrative. He’s awesome. His likes are motorcycles, filmmaking, and brewing both beer and coffee for self-consumption.
Ryan in southeast asia

Our Goal

We want to make millions and millions of dollars and eventually take over a large chunk of the world.

Until that happens, we’ll settle with helping out a community of like-minded, travel-obsessed people. We hope that you will be able to use the information we have gathered, mistakes we have made, and the secrets we have uncovered while traveling to make your own adventure easier, more affordable, and just like better and shit.

We would also like to encourage people to get out there, see the world, try something new – dress like the opposite sex, do some weird sex stuff, drink your own pee (but not someone else’s) – whatever sounds like fun to you but doesn’t hurt anyone but your parents. At the end of it all, when you’re on your deathbed, you probably won’t be thinking about that great juicer you bought. Memories will be cherished most, so get out there and make some good ones.

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13 Comments

  1. oscar
    October 19, 2011 @ 9:27 pm

    Hi guys! I was checking out your videos. I think they’re awesome. I have a few questions about the one named: Itchy Feet on the Cheap – Chapter 6: Machu Picchu…I plan to travel from the US to South America in a lapse of 6 months – 1 year….obviously I can’t miss Machu Picchu, but I also want to save some money….I want to know if when you guys got out in hidroelectrica and started walking to aguas calientes, did you guys walked through a established path? The reason to this question is because I’m taking my motorcycle. So, I would like to know if is possible to take my motorcycle all the way to Aguas Calientes…I hope I was clear on the question….well…thanks for your time…keep traveling…:)

    Reply

    • itchyfeetonthecheap
      October 25, 2011 @ 11:18 am

      The path from the hydroelectrica station to Aguas Calientes is actually the train tracks. What kind of motorcycle are you riding? I think it would be a pretty rough ride unless it was a dirt bike. Parts of it are extremely rocky and there is a long train bridge with a pedestrian path that would probably be too narrow for a bike. If you could find a safe place to park your motorcycle in Santa Teresa it would be easy to find a ride to the hydroelectrico station and from there it’s a pleasant 2 hour walk.
      It sounds like an amazing adventure you have planned. Let us know how it goes.

      Reply

      • elpatadeperro
        March 10, 2012 @ 4:57 pm

        I’m taking a kawasaki klr 650…its a dual purpose type of bike; do you remember if the bridge is drivable? Because I might just try to drive the motorcycle through it…I will let you guys know how it went….

        Reply

  2. rolfepope
    July 24, 2012 @ 7:23 am

    Your post here is right on the spot.

    I will be arriving by plane in Tacna, and want to go straight to Arica. If I get downtown by 3 PM in the afternoon, will I have plenty of time to get to Arica the same day.

    Thanks for your post. I will look forward to your response.

    Rolfe Pope

    Reply

    • itchyfeetonthecheap
      July 24, 2012 @ 5:02 pm

      Yes, you will have more than enough time to get to Arica. The border crossing is quick and easy, and there are more than enough people willing to take you across at the bus station. The drive (by taxi) is about an hour. In total (including paperwork on the Peruvian end and waits at the border) it shouldn’t be more than an hour and a half to get to Arica.

      Hope this helps!

      Enjoy your trip.

      Sara

      Reply

  3. Rolfe
    July 24, 2012 @ 5:19 pm

    Thank you very much for your reply.

    I will be starting a new travel blog, and will let you now. I will also keep offering comments on your blog.

    Again, I really appreciate your advice.

    Rolfe Pope

    Reply

  4. Brian
    September 5, 2012 @ 9:06 am

    Hi guys, I stumbled onto your monkey/cats video on YouTube. Little did I know you’re also fellow Torontonians! Excellent site, and thanks for the travel tips! Sites like this are always valuable for future travelers, and I plan on doing something similar. Cheers!

    Reply

    • itchyfeetonthecheap
      September 5, 2012 @ 4:41 pm

      Thanks Brian! Let us know when you start your site so we can check it out.

      Reply

  5. Rolfe Pope
    January 18, 2013 @ 10:22 am

    I commented on your Valparaiso post. I don’t expect you to publish this comment. I have you listed on my blog (www.memorypoint.net). If you look at my blog and like it, maybe you might list a link for my blog.

    Rolfe Pope

    Reply

  6. Ronald Oldham
    July 7, 2013 @ 12:19 pm

    Hi Guys, I discovered your site and love it. Planning an extensive trip to southeast asia. Will visit chaing mai, chaing rai,Ventiane? Laos, Phuket, and a few places in Vietmam. Any suggestions on a 60 year man traveling solo throughout this area of the world. My wife will retire once i have picked a site to live in this area of the world.Will be on site for 6 months.
    Thanks for any advice.

    Reply

    • itchyfeetonthecheap
      July 12, 2013 @ 8:58 pm

      Hi Ronald. Thanks for reading. We don’t have any solo traveling experiences but the places you listed that we’ve been to were all great. I could see myself retiring in Northern Thailand and Chiang Mai is a good option if you want to have some extra comforts. There is a large expat population there which might not matter to you, but it means that there are a few more 1st world comforts and more options for food. Laos is amazing but you would be roughing it a bit more — nothing terrible though. Vientiane is pretty modernized. After travelling for a few weeks through Cambodia and Laos we were happy to get there because it meant having food options that weren’t just Southeast Asian (mexican, chinese, indian, etc). I’ve heard really good things about northern Laos but we haven’t been there yet. I love Vietnam. At first it’s a little crazy and the people seem pushy, but when you get out of the tourist areas it’s fantastic. It’s also more modernized. You probably won’t have hot water coming out of your bathroom sink’s tap in Thailand or Laos, but you most likely will in Vietnam. I’m sure you’ll find a place that has the vibe you are looking for. Let us know where you end up!

      Reply

    • Prorackajack
      July 13, 2013 @ 2:54 am

      Also loved Luang Prabang in Laos, so beautiful and not too big.
      We were a couple travelling last fall, age 59 and 46 and we loved all of SE Asia.
      Vietnam was really great, plan to,have two weeks just to,get through it, bigger than we realized.
      Check out our blog
      http://prorackajack.wordpress.com

      To see where we went in six weeks. You will love it. Food is awesome there too.
      Michelle

      Reply

  7. wisemonkeysabroad
    March 14, 2014 @ 5:26 pm

    Awesome blog you have here! Two months in South America must’ve been unreal. After spending 4 months in Europe back in ’06, we discovered that was the best way to travel – to spend big chunks of time on a continent but sadly full-time work gets in the way 😉 Happy travels! And off to explore more of you blog!!

    Reply

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